FEATURED PUBLICATION

Harriet is cinematic church. This weekend, Black women gathered in a Tampa theater reciting spirituals, sniffling, clapping, and talking back to the big screen at the larger-than-life historical heroine, Harriet Tubman. In the wake of national conversations about the delay of “General Tubman” on the $20 bill and the arrival of the first Africans to the British (American) colonies in 1619, Eve’s Bayou director Kasi Lemmons brings her auteur style to the Virginia-production using dreamscapes, conjure women, and spirit-filled land to flesh the early lives of Black folk freedom-dreaming along the Chesapeake, and Combahee and Delaware rivers. The movie is riveting.

Early talk about Harriet could have tanked it. To date, negative criticism about the live free or die tryin’ OG has been anchored by two claims to authenticity—the authenticity of a British-Nigerian actor, Cynthia Erivo, playing a revered African American, and the authenticity of a life narrative dramatized without the documentary conventions of a typical biopic.

Critics picked. Pulling up old social media posts and pulling out fact-checking sheets critics tried to poke holes in a movie amid the surging fanfare by Black women who take politics and popular culture seriously. Never mind that some critics have found offense at a movie’s narrative truth but remain unmoved bypresidential untruths that have had deadly consequences for communities of color. Never mind that some critics could have applauded Erivo and Lemmons on a Hollywood-produced story mining a diasporic past and a Wakanda-like Afrofuture. They did not remark on the overrepresentation of African Americans who stand in for all Black people across space and time. The selective picking is not surprising. In my mind, the criticism about Harriet has less to do with the actor or the narrative. Some critics do not know what to do with our stories. They do not know how to see us when there is no charismatic Black male lead(er), white savior, pinup superhero battle, or Hart-Haddish outlandish comedy. For critics and a country still catching up to the badassness of unbossed blackness, screening an abolitionist-conductor-soldier-suffragist through a Lemmons Black feminist lens is akin to seeing Moses.

BOOKS

HOME WITH HIP HOP FEMINISM: PERFORMANCES IN COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE

HOME GIRLS, MAKE SOME NOISE!: HIP HOP FEMINISM ANTHOLOGY

GLOBALIZING CULTURAL STUDIES:  ETHNOGRAPHIC INTERVENTIONS IN THEORY, METHOD & POLICY

BOOK CHAPTERS & JOURNAL ARTICLES

​Durham, A. (2018). White folks: race and identity in rural America. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 1-2. doi:10.1080/01419870.2018.1499949

Durham, A. (2017). “Class Formation: Beyoncé in Music Video Production.” Black Camera: The New Series, 9(1), pp. 197-204.

 

Durham, A. (2017). “On Collards” (Autoethnography). International Review of Qualitative Research, 10(1), pp. 22-23.

 

Durham, A. (2017). “Analog Girl in a Digital World: Hip Hop Feminism and Media Activism,” In Victor Pickard and Guobin Yang (eds.), Media Activism in the Digital Age. New York: Routledge, pp. 205-215.

Durham, A. (2017). “Do We Need a Body Count to Count? Notes on the Serial Murders of Black Women,” In Brittney Cooper, Susana Morris and Robin Boylorn (eds). The Crunk Feminist Collection. New York: The Feminist Press, City University of New York, pp. 22-24.

 

Durham, A. (2017). “Inconceivable: Black Infertility,” In Brittney Cooper, Susana Morris and Robin Boylorn (eds). The Crunk Feminist Collection. New York: The Feminist Press, City University of New York, pp. 88-91.

 

Durham, A. (2017). “Sticks, Stones, and Microphones: A Melody of Misogyny,” In Brittney Cooper, Susana Morris and Robin Boylorn (eds). The Crunk Feminist Collection. New York: The Feminist Press, City University of New York, pp. 178-179.

 

 Durham, A. (2017). “Nicki’s World,” In Brittney Cooper, Susana Morris and Robin Boylorn (eds). The Crunk Feminist Collection. New York: The Feminist Press, City University of New York, pp. 215-217.

 

Cooper, B., Durham, A., Morris, S., and Raimist, R. (2017). “Ten Crunk Commandments for Reinvigorating Hip Hop Feminist Studies,” In Brittney Cooper, Susana Morris and Robin Boylorn (eds). The Crunk Feminist Collection. New York: The Feminist Press, City University of New York, pp. 172-174.

Durham, A. (2015). “_____ While Black: Millennial Race Play and the Post-Hip-Hop Generation.” Cultural Studies ↔ Critical Methodologies, pp. 253-259.

 

Durham, A. (2015). Kindred narratives: reflections of southern black orality in 'Sweetwater.' Qualitative Inquiry, 21(2), pp. 122-124.

 

Alexander, B. K., Arasaratnam, L. A., Avant-Mier, R., Durham, A., Flores, L., Leeds-Hurwitz, W., Mendoza, S. L., Oetzel, J., Osland, J., Tsuda, Y., Yin, J., Halualani, R. T. (2014). Defining and Communicating What “Intercultural” and “Intercultural Communication” Means To Us. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 7(01), 14-37. doi: 10.1080/17513057.2014.869524

 

Alexander, B. K., Arasaratnam, L. A., Avant-Mier, R., Durham, A., Flores, L., Leeds-Hurwitz, W., Mendoza, S. L., Oetzel, J., Osland, J., Tsuda, Y., Yin, J., Halualani, R. T. (2014). Identifying Key Intercultural Urgencies, Issues, and Challenges in Today’s World: Connecting Our Scholarship to Dynamic Contexts and Historical Moments. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 7(01), 38-67. doi: 10.1080/17513057.2014.869527

 

Alexander, B. K., Arasaratnam, L. A., Avant-Mier, R., Durham, A., Flores, L., Leeds-Hurwitz, W., Mendoza, S. L., Oetzel, J., Osland, J., Tsuda, Y., Yin, J., Halualani, R. T. (2014). Our Role as Intercultural Scholars, Practitioners, Activists, and Teachers in Addressing These Key Intercultural Urgencies, Issues, and Challenges. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 7(01), 68-99. doi: 10.1080/17513057.2014.869526

 

Alexander, B. K., Arasaratnam, L. A., Avant-Mier, R., Durham, A., Flores, L., Leeds-Hurwitz, W., Mendoza, S. L., Oetzel, J., Osland, J., Tsuda, Y., Yin, J., Halualani, R. T. (2014). Introducing the Discussion and One Another. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 7(01), 4-13. doi: 10.1080/17513057.2014.869523

 

Durham, A., Cooper, B., & Morris, S. (2013). The Stage Hip-Hop Feminism Built. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 38(3), pp. 721-737.

 

Durham, A. (2012).  “Check on it”: Beyoncé, Southern Booty and Black Femininities in Music Video. Feminist Media Studies, 12(1), pp. 35-49.

 

Durham, A. (2010).  Hip Hop Feminist Media Studies.  International Journal of Africana Studies, 16(2), pp 117-135. Reprint (forthcoming, March 2014) in Dropping Knowledge: Hip Hop Pedagogy in the Academy, K. Stanford & C. Jones (Eds.). Black Classic Press.

 

McCarthy, C. Durham, A., Elavsky, C.M., Filmer, A., Giardina, M., Harewood, S., Kim, S., Logue, J., Malagreca, M., & Mowatt, R. (2009). “Introduction. Contesting Identities, Contesting Nation,” Policy Futures in Education, 7(2), pp. 138-144.

 

Durham, A. (2009). “Behind Beats and Rhymes: Working Class from a Hampton Roads Hip Hop Homeplace.” Policy Futures in Education, 7(2), pp. 217-229.

 

Ellis, C., Adams, T., Ellingson, L., Bochner, A., Denzin, N., Durham, A., Madison, D. S., Alexander, R., Pelias, R., Defenbaugh, N., and Richardson, L. (2009). “Mentoring Relationships: Creating a Future for Qualitative Inquiry.” In Norman Denzin and Michael Giardina (eds.), Qualitative Inquiry and Social Justice. Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press, pp. 279-302.

 

Durham, A. (2008). “Between Us: A Bio-Poem.” Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism, 8(2), pp. 177-182.

 

Durham, A. and Baez, J. (2007). “A Tail of Two Women: Exploring the Contours of Difference in Popular Culture,” In Stephanie Springgay and Debra Freedman (eds.), Curriculum and the Cultural Body. New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, pp. 130-145.

 

McCarthy, C. Durham, A., Engel, L., Filmer, A., Giardina, M., and Malagreca, M. (2007). “Introduction:  Confronting Cultural Studies in Globalizing Times.” In Cameron McCarthy, Aisha Durham, Laura Engel, Alice A. Filmer, Michael D. Giardina, Jennifer Logue, Miguel Malagreca (eds.), Globalizing Cultural Studies:  Ethnographic Interventions in Theory, Method, & Policy. New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, pp. xviii-xxxiv.

 

Durham, A. (2007). “Recalling the Ethnographic Displacement of Hip Hop/Home/Bodies.” In Cameron McCarthy, Aisha Durham, Laura Engel, Alice A. Filmer, Michael D. Giardina, Jennifer Logue, Miguel Malagreca (eds.), Globalizing Cultural Studies:  Ethnographic Interventions in Theory, Method, & Policy. New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, pp. 153-166.

 

Durham, A. (2007). Using [Living Hip Hop] Feminism: Redefining an Answer (to) Rap. In Gwendolyn Pough, Elaine Richardson, Aisha Durham, and Rachel Raimist (eds.), Home Girls, Make Some Noise!: Hip Hop Feminism Anthology. New York: Parker Publishing, pp. 304-312.

 

Durham, A. (2004). “Verbal Exchange.” Qualitative Inquiry, (10)4, pp. 493-495.

 

 Durham, A. (2003). “Holloween: The Morning-After Poem.” Qualitative Inquiry, (9)2, pp. 300-302.

 

Durham, A. (2003). “For Teri.” Qualitative Inquiry, 9(1), pp. 18-20.

©2017 by Aisha Durham